Have you tried turning it off and on again?

IT Crowd - Roy

Yosemite has been playing nicely on my MacBook Air so I decided it was time to upgrade the iMac.

After doing all the usual safety procedures and testing the backups it was time to upgrade. The iMac has had a few OS X upgrades since I bought it – it came with 10.6 Snow Leopard – and I did consider doing a clean install. However the “normal” upgrade route has had good reports so I opted for that.

The upgrade proceeded smoothly to begin with and I left it to get on with it, however when I returned some time later it seemed to have stuck on the last install screen at 50% complete. I left it for about half an hour and nothing had changed so I did what any highly trained Mac technician would do.

I powered it off and on again.

That did the trick and the iMac booted happily. I had been pretty sure it had got stuck at the reboot stage of the process so turning it off and on again forced the reboot it should have done by itself. Just to be on the safe side I then restarted it up in Safe (or Single User) Mode (Cmd + S) and ran /sbin/fsck -fy. Next, I booted from the Recovery Partition (Cmd + R) and used Disk Utility to repair permissions on the iMac’s startup disk.

Since then it has been fine and I’m now in the process of reorganising my data files to take advantage of iCloud Drive.

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Yosemite

When Yosemite first dropped I wasn’t in the mood to be one of the “early adopters”. Normally with a new OS I’d be straight in there but I put off updating from Mavericks and I think I did the right thing. Apparently there were lots of minor problems reported on the discussion forums, not least a problem with dropped WiFi connections. Anyway, I decided I’d wait for a point release and then of course I had my eye problem…

Now that Apple have released a further point release (OS X 10.10.2) which purported amongst other things to fix the WiFi issue I thought I’d update my MacBook Air for starters. Opinion is divided between those who simply update from whatever their existing OS was and those who insist that a clean install followed by a restore of their backed-up data is the only surefire way to a reliable system. I thought I would risk the former and use my backup plan to do a clean install and restore if necessary.

I followed my usual backup method – which is really about ensuring I have a good backup in case of a SNAFU – prior to starting the update. In other words:

  1. Backup to external disk using Time Machine
  2. Create a bootable clone of the entire Macintosh HD partition on an external disk (I use Superduper!).
  3. Test the clone by booting from it and testing the basic functions of OS X.
  4. Verifying the Macintosh HD disk.

No. 4 gave me a couple of disk errors. Nothing serious. Nevertheless I booted the Mac in safe mode (that’s booting it while holding down the CMD and S keys) and running fsck to check and repair the disk:

/sbin/fsck – fy

It found some minor file allocation errors and then returned the message “Macintosh HD appears to be OK” (which is always a good sign). I rebooted it as normal and downloaded the Yosemite installer from the Apple App store.

It pays to have a Plan B, which in my case would be to restore everything to its last Mavericks configuration – I have a backup for that! – but it’s very useful to have a stand-alone copy of the OS X installer on a USB drive. If you have that, you can boot from it and run diagnostics or repairs from there and/or install the OS from scratch if need be. A useful spin-off is that if you have several Macs to update to the new OS, having a copy of the installer on a portable disk saves having to download the large installer image onto each Mac.

Starting with Mavericks, Apple have made it easy to create a bootable copy of the installer. There are other ways of doing it but I think using Apple’s “createinstallmedia” utility is fine. Here’s the method:

  1. When you download the OS X Installer app, it places it in the Applications folder. This method assumes you’ve left it there. (Don’t forget, if you run the installer and update the Mac, the installer app gets deleted from the Applications folder afterwards, so you need to create the USB copy first).
  2. Using Disk Utility, format an 8GB USB drive and give it the label “Untitled”. Leave it connected to a USB port on your Mac.
  3. Open a Terminal window and enter this command:

    sudo /Applications/Install\ OS\ X\ Yosemite.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallmedia –volume /Volumes/Untitled –applicationpath /Applications/Install\ OS\ X\ Yosemite.app –nointeraction

  4. Let it run (takes a while!) and you will be left with a bootable USB disk containing the installer.
  5. To start your Mac from the USB drive, start the Mac whilst holding the Option (alt) key down. Once the Mac starts it will display the list of available bootable drives, select the USB drive from that list.

So, having tested my backups, downloaded the OS X update and created my USB installer, I was ready to undertake the update.

The Yosemite update was very straightforward (as Apple intended) and my Mac was soon up and running. I’ve left iCloud Drive off for the moment until I’m happy that everything is working as it should.

iPhone 6

I’m pleased with my iPhone 6.

I haven’t managed to bend it.

I’m not going to wax lyrical about it because I’m not interested in stirring up the trolls or haters.  See paragraph one for my iPhone 6 review.

I’m not sure about the changes Apple have made to Photos with iOS 8, although I think I can see why they have done what they’ve done. It will be interesting to see how it all works once Yosemite drops. The only issue I’ve found is with the Instagram App which displays every photo on the device in duplicate (FB and others seem to have got it right).

Being a clumsy sort of fellow I have ordered a case for it, hopefully that will arrive tomorrow.