Backups

So, the other day I deleted an App from my iPhone in an attempt to fix a bug, with the idea that I would re-install the App thus fixing the bug. I then had a bit of mild panic because I couldn’t find the App in the App Store to download. Fortunately I remembered that the iPhone ‘hides’ purchased Apps so when I looked there, there it was. Phew. Unfortunately re-installing it didn’t fix the bug but that’s a different story.

The point is, whilst I was panicking, I thought I could always restore the iPhone from the iTunes backup on my Mac. Then I remembered how old that backup was. So today I backed up my iPhone and iPad to my Mac. While I was there I backed up some other key data on the iOS devices keeping those backups independent from the catch-all iTunes one.

A word about iOS backups: although you can backup your iOS device to iCloud (and it’s great that it does this automatically if you leave your device on, locked & connected to a power source), it doesn’t  backup everything (e.g. Apps!). It’s certainly worth doing a periodic iTunes backup as well.

Hint: turn on Encryption before hitting that ‘Back Up Now’ button, that way it will save all your logon credentials, saving you loads of time if/when you come to do a restore.

itbup

One more thing. Don’t forget to backup your Mac’s HDD (using Time Machine or similar).

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Passwords, and when, Oh when, will they kill off Flash?

I saw this on the Ars website recently.

Good security practice

Of course, it’s not as simple as that, so it’s worth reading the article from whence it came.

Then there is Flash. Steve Jobs hated it but not because he hated Adobe. Flash was a power hungry plug-in which didn’t sit at all well with his plans for iPad (etc.). Of course, things have moved on a bit since then. Java and Flash have shown themselves to be, um, susceptible to hacking, malware, trojans, etc..

Java (JRE) has largely disappeared from our browsers and it is mainly enterprise applications which still rely on its continued availability (my daughter’s employer’s internet-accessed HR system for one).

Many websites still use Flash but they don’t need to.There is HTML5. Even YouTube doesn’t rely on it any more. So I think it is time for Flash to die. I’ll leave you to make up your own minds.