Caching in Suffolk

I haven’t posted about my caching adventures recently. Apols, chaps! Been busy, etc.. Time to rectify the deficit then. We recently spent a few days R & R in Suffolk, where I hoped to bag a few caches even though this was a family break (which normally means geocaching is frowned upon by everyone except me).

Nevertheless, I had loaded the results of some PQs onto my Garmin and I knew that there was a series of caches starting near to the house we had rented for the duration. Anyway, the first morning, I had some time to kill whilst waiting for the rest of the tribe to surface for breakfast, so I was wandering about in the rear garden with Skye. I just happened to have my Garmin with me…

Nearest cache: 17 metres! Wow! That worked out to just past the end of the garden. I had already noticed that there was a footpath running next to the house…

Gate post and start of footpath

You can see the start of the trail to the left of the pillar. Luckily I didn’t have to walk back to there. The garden fence separating us from the footpath could best be described as nominal, so Skye & I simply ducked through a gap in the shrubbery and set off along the path. Of course it didn’t take long to reach GZ – which turned out to be a few metres beyond the end of the garden – and the cache (Country walk 1 (wireman sam)) was easily spotted.

‘That was quick’, I thought, and Skye thought so too, so we decided to pick up the next in the series (Country Walk 2 (pandora’s box)). A short walk ensued and then I was a bit stumped. The arrow suggested it was off the path and the hint told me it wasn’t a ‘base of tree’ or similar. So then, what? We followed the arrow off piste and found this:

Pandora's box.

Of course, the cache name now made perfect sense! Researching the CO, it seems sarah2kids has a penchant for quirky and inventive cache containers and, by all accounts, puns. A great cache, this!

Oh well, c’mon Skye, time for breakfast!

Later, we visited Snape Maltings. Nothing to do with Hogwarts as it turned out. However we did go for a walk along the river.

Just a view along the riverside boardwalk at Snape

At one point, we passed a chap who was just standing near the path and doing something on his phone. He looked a bit suspicious, a cacher perhaps? So I checked the map and Lo! we were near New and Improved Iken Icon. Hmm. We carried on with our walk (very pleasant) and on our return I set up the cache on my iPhone (my Garmin was in the car). When we got to where the suspicious character had been earlier, the arrow swung to the right, pointing into a clump of small trees, so I set off for a search. The hint was no help so I adopted the ‘where would I hide it?’ methodology and soon spotted a tell-tale bunch of stick-o-flage. The last entry in the log was several weeks earlier, so either that chap (a) was not a geocacher or (b) didn’t find it!

So that’s it for now. I shall post again! 🙂

London caches

Last Tuesday we all went up to town as Mrs. WizzardPrang and our daughters had a tickets to the Alexander McQueen exhibition in the Victoria & Albert Museum. I just tagged along for the ride, the plan was to meet up for lunch afterwards.

So, while I was waiting for them to complete their visit, what to do?

Hmm. Oh, wait!

I only had an hour and a half but I managed:

  • The Virtual in the V&A
  • A Church Micro Multi
  • 2 Earth Caches at the Natural History Museum
  • A Trad at the Albert Hall.

Not a bad morning’s work.

Another Postcard from New York

Happy days!

happy days

 

Making ladder climbing more difficult:

health and safety

 

Rock-climbing pipe cleaners:

rock climbing pipe cleaners

 

“I don’t give a shit”:

sign seller

 

Central Park Proposal:

the propsal

 

Dogs and Pretzels:

hot dog cart

 

An Englishman in New York:

mclaren

 

Courtesy, Professionalism, Respect:

nypd vehicles

 

The subway cars are air-conditioned!:

subway

 

Americans are very patriotic:

stars and stripes

 

911 Memorial. Respect and Remembrance:

911 Memorial

 

Back to my park

We recently had a family holiday in Manhattan. NYC is one of our favourite places and we had an awesome time. Unfortunately as soon as we got home, I found that my mother had been taken ill and I’ve spent the last week dealing with that. So rather than basking in a post-holiday afterglow all I got was jet lag and the NHS.

This just goes to prove how important it is to grab that holiday moment and enjoy where you are and what you are doing when you are doing it. Good old Carpe Diem, as they say.

Hence, it has taken a while to get around to posting anything and I have yet to complete the edit of my holiday snaps. Meanwhile, as I sit in front of my Mac with this

lager

bringing back memories of last week, here’s a “postcard from New York”.

When in Manhattan we always seem to gravitate to Bryant Park. Unlike Central Park it is a small, friendly rectangle of green at the back of the Library where New York’s natives go to sunbathe, read, eat lunch, play chess or listen to the lunchtime pianist. Incidentely, here’s a sign you will never see in an English park.

bryant park

In case you were waiting for some tales of geocaching, I must say right now that this was not a caching holiday.

Really.

Definitely.

No geocaching.

On pain of death.

Nevertheless…

We did find one cache, mainly so that Daughter.1 could get a USA cache and the NY State souvenir. One lunchtime we found Bryant Park Micro. Caching in Manhattan is not easy, the GPS is mostly rubbish due to the tall buildings (much worse than London, which you would expect) and most of the caches are either micros or nanos. Plus, as you already know, New York never sleeps. There are always hundreds of people milling about. Luckily this one could be completed using the hint and some dead reckoning (read the page) and in fact having read it up in the hotel I didn’t get my GPS out at all. The container was pretty big by Manhattan standards – a mag key safe – although with the park being full of people, retrieving it was not easy. Still, with a bit of subterfuge/bare-faced cheek, job done.

With the geocaching out of our system, so to speak, it was on with the sightseeing. Back on 5th I found this. A ready-made business for me if ever there was one.

my shop

Our hotel was pretty close to the Empire State Building. Here’s a hand-held shot of it from our roof terrace on Labor Day evening. Sorry I didn’t have a tripod. In case you didn’t know, the ESB people light up the top in a wide range of colour combinations to mark special events.

ESB on Labor Day

And here it is the next morning, taken before breakfast. <sigh>.

ESB day

Talking of food, I had a lot of these (but not for breakfast).

burger

Yum. 🙂

Once I get my photographic act together I’ll post a few more New York snaps.

Bye for now. 😉

Last week I haz been mainly…

This last week I have been mainly decorating my Mother in Law’s new pad; whilst at home, amongst other things, I mended a wardrobe door, re-washered a tap and had the Freelander serviced.

What with doing all that plus the usual household admin there hasn’t been any time for caching at all. Not good!

I have solved a puzzle cache although as it’s not local I have yet to go and find it.  At least other local cachers have been a bit more productive, my new series in particular has had a few visitors. Which is nice.

Bentley Priory

Bentley Priory and Guardians

Family visit to Bentley Priory last Wednesday. As you know, this was the headquarters of RAF Fighter Command during WW2. From there Air Chief Marshal Hugh Dowding ran the Battle of Britain. In later years the house became the Officers Mess for RAF Stanmore before being sold off to developers in 2008. Luckily part of the deal was for the Priory to be restored to host the Bentley Priory Museum. Lots of information here.

Fighter Command Crest  Spitfire Gate Guardian

For anyone with an interest in WWII or history in general a visit is a must. For anyone ignorant of the part Bentley Priory played in the Battle of Britain (or even of the battle itself) it is definitely worth a visit, if for no other reason than the excellent short film which provides an excellent introduction.

 

  

To begin with, the Filter Room was located in the grand ballroom, however before the Battle of Britain it had been relocated to a much safer (and resilient) underground bunker. After the war this was filled in and a new bunker constructed in time for the Cold War, unfortunately this isn’t open to visitors. If you really want to see what the underground control room would have been like, there is an exact copy at RAF Uxbridge but that’s another story.