Passwords, and when, Oh when, will they kill off Flash?

I saw this on the Ars website recently.

Good security practice

Of course, it’s not as simple as that, so it’s worth reading the article from whence it came.

Then there is Flash. Steve Jobs hated it but not because he hated Adobe. Flash was a power hungry plug-in which didn’t sit at all well with his plans for iPad (etc.). Of course, things have moved on a bit since then. Java and Flash have shown themselves to be, um, susceptible to hacking, malware, trojans, etc..

Java (JRE) has largely disappeared from our browsers and it is mainly enterprise applications which still rely on its continued availability (my daughter’s employer’s internet-accessed HR system for one).

Many websites still use Flash but they don’t need to.There is HTML5. Even YouTube doesn’t rely on it any more. So I think it is time for Flash to die. I’ll leave you to make up your own minds.

Advertisements

Darn! That’s the same one I use on my luggage!

I was amused to read the latest “pop chart” for passwords on Ars Technica, where they published the top 25 from SplashData’s annual survey. It’s interesting that their raw data came from passwords published as a result of the Adobe hack, which in itself illustrates the importance of not using the same password on all your on-line accounts.

So not only should you use a hard to guess password, you should also use a unique one for each on-line account. That way, even if someone discovers one of your passwords they won’t be able to use that anywhere else.

However, in another Ars article there may be some good news, as it seems the number of people using those chart topping passwords is actually decreasing.

I’m hoping you won’t spot your own favourite passwords in the top 25 but if you do there are some simple things you can do.

  1. Use a password Manager
  2. Chose unique passwords made up of random letters, numbers and other characters (e.g. $,%,&)
  3. Don’t be afraid to write them down somewhere safe and in a way that doesn’t hint at what they are to anyone else.