Your Mission…

I have finally started the famously difficult geocache: “Your Mission…“. This is widely held to be one of the best geocaches ever and is one I have planned to do for several years. Unfortunately other “life events” have got in the way over the last few years but now I’m in a position where I can go for it.

If you know anything about this cache, you’ll know how long it takes to complete. I’ve done a few stages before running out of time so I’ll keep you updated as I progress towards the final. Once I’ve done it I will try to encapsulate the experience in a blog. Bet you can’t wait!

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The Quizzical Smile

Last Wednesday Bob and I finally managed our long-awaited caching trip to the Quizzical Smile series. This is a series of 18 easy puzzle caches (plus a bonus) which, once logged as found, look like this on the map:

Cache smilies in the shape of a smilie on GC's map

The weather had been good in the days leading up to the Wednesday, at which point the whole of England was covered with rain. We delayed our start for about an hour, so by the time we left the car most of the rain had cleared eastwards in the general direction of Cambridge. For the first hour it was a bit drizzly but by the time it cleared up we were well into our stride. All the caches were fairly easy finds although some required a bit of searching, jumping ditches, etc. At each cache we collected a value for the bonus. Well, at the first one we forgot, and had to retrieve the container again. We didn’t forget the others.

En route, we found this object:

a strange metal object in a field

I have no idea what it is.

After we’d found about half the caches, we got to the point where we had to head along another path roughly in the direction from whence we came, so it seemed an ideal time to pause for a brew and to collect a couple of other nearby caches belonging to the Hatley Heart Attack series. It was then that we met a lady walking her dog – she turned out to be the only person we encountered all day! I think the weather may have had something to do with it. Once we’d found all 18 puzzle caches, we worked out the coords for the bonus and made our way there. As we approached, we knew exactly where the cache would be, but it was a bit of a struggle to reach the container. Maybe the CO had very long arms.

After that we headed back towards our parking spot, with a detour to pick up a bunch of Hatley Heart Attacks.

After lunch, we relocated towards Cambridge. While planning our trip, Bob had drawn my attention to The Cambridge Positioning System. A puzzle based loosely on the mathematics behind the GPS, it is also near the One Mile Radio Telescope which we drove past, sometime later,  on our way home.

One Mile Radio Telescope

The Cambridge Positioning System was a D3.5 puzzle but after nearly tearing my hair out solving it, I think it should have been more like a D5. Have a look at the cache page and see what you think. It’s maths. I hate maths. I used to hate maths back when I was doing A-Level Maths. In the intervening <cough!> <hrmph!> years I have forgotten all the difficult stuff.

So, I had a go at working out the puzzle. I knew it involved Pythagorus but to be honest that didn’t really help me much. Luckily Bob had already solved it so he gave me some help (well, basically a maths lesson) to the point where I was actually able to solve the various equations myself. It took me a while! At GZ, we found the cache and then had to open it in order to sign the log. Of course, we’d done the necessary maths beforehand. Rarely have I been so pleased to log a find!

The Cambridge Positioning System was, incidentally, my 1,323rd. find.

We stopped later on for a cuppa before heading home, where we happened to find a nice Cache ‘n Dash. That last one made the total for the trip: 28 finds. Marvellous!

Getting all steamed up

Today we were going up towards Leicester in Bob’s Range Rover to do some greenlaning and caching.

Unfortunately at about junction 15 on the M1 we were becalmed in a huge stationary queue (due to the motorway being closed at J16). We were just sitting there, waiting for some movement in the traffic and chatting about caching when Woomph! Huge clouds of steam billowed out from under the Range Rover’s bonnet. When it had died down we investigated. Here’s what had happened:

radiator

The radiator filler plug had sheared off and blown out, taking the coolant with it. By the time the recovery chap had rescued us and the AA had effected a repair it was too late to continue our trip so we headed for home.

We did manage 4 caches on the way but it wasn’t as many as we had planned.

Oh well, there’s always another day.