GSAK update

I’ve been unable to get out geocaching for the last few months. Skye (my part time geodog) had ruptured one of her cruciate ligaments so we had to restrict her walks. Finally we decided that she needed an op. to repair it (Maybe this will be the subject of a separate post in due course) which meant even less outdoor activity (for all of us involved in her care).

So I’ve been doing some work on GSAK. One of the things which prevented me from using it fully was that every time I ran a GPX file import, it finished with a Windows memory error and bombed out. I had an old MacBook Air lying around so I updated that to OS X 10.12 (MacOS Sierra) so that it had the same OS as my current MacBook Pro. Then, on the MacBook Air, I downloaded the latest stable version of Winebottler and GSAK8. This latest build allowed me to create an App Bundle using Windows 7 – loads better than the old version I was using (which was probably XP).

The resulting App runs faster than before and is (so far) completely stable. This build has also cured another defect present in the old version, namely the cache details appearing in the split screen view for only the current cache when GSAK launches. With this latest version, scrolling through the list of caches (waypoints as GSAK calls them) causes whichever cache is current to have its details displayed in the bottom screen. Cool.

So, after a bit of testing on the MacBook Air, I deleted the old App, Wine & Winebottler from my MacBook Pro before repeating the installation of the latest stable Winebottler & GSAK.

I should state at this point that before deleting anything from the MacBook Pro, I made sure I had a good backup of the live GSAK database.

Deleting Apps from Winebottler can be done from within Winebottler from the “On my Mac” window:

Screen Shot 2017-09-29 at 22.22.57

However, while this removes the GSAK App from the Mac’s Applications folder, in my experience not  everything got removed, so I also checked the user’s Library, i.e. for anything starting with GSAK8, in:

Users/~/Library/Application Support/

and these files in Users/~/Library/Preferences/ :

  • org.kronenberg.Wine.plist
  • org.kronenberg.WineBottler.plist
  • org.kronenberg.Winetricks.plist

and moved them to the Trash.

Then it was a simple task to install a fresh copy of Winebottler and then build the GSAK App. Once I’d done that, I restored the database from my backup and registered GSAK with my GSAK licence key, The final task was to obtain a new Groundspeak API key from the Geocaching website. You can find how to do this from the GSAK forum so I’m not going to repeat it here.

Anyway, the new version continues to work well on my MacBook Pro. The MacBook Air will come in handy for testing new versions as and when they drop, I can also take it with me on Geocaching road trips – much less risky than using my MacBook Pro!

 

 

 

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iMac speed improvements

I’ve been annoyed at the laggardly behaviour of our iMac, currently running El Capitan, 10.11.6 . We’ve had the old girl for a few years now and I was sure that successive OS X upgrades had left some crud clogging it up – somewhere!

Even though I had cleaned up the Login Items for each user in System Preferences, I suspected there were other App “helpers” still running.

(Follow along if you want to try this at home).

Make sure you have a good backup.

Start up in Safe Mode (Hold <Shift> throughout startup).

Open a Finder window and go to Macintosh HD/Library/Launch Agents

In my case, I found these files:

com.adobe.AAM.Updater-1.0.plist

com.adobe.ARMDCHelper.<a very long hex number>.plist

com.google.keystone.agent.plist

The first 2 related to Adobe Air and the Adobe Auto Updater. I thought I had deleted Adobe Air a long time ago but on further investigation I found it was still there! So I deleted it. I also deleted Adobe Acrobat reader because I no longer use it. I then deleted the .plist files. Of course, if you find similar files and you use Adobe Air or other Adobe products, you won’t want to delete them. Obviously your requirements will differ from mine.

The third file was more “interesting”. This is an auto update Daemon which Google uses to check for updates to products you have installed. In my case, the Chrome browser and NIK plug-ins. I decided to find out how often it “phones home”.

In Terminal, type:

defaults read com.google.Keystone.Agent and press <Return>

It spits out a lot of stuff about the Apps it checks, etc., ending with:

checkInterval = 18000;

Hmm. That’s every 5 hours. Overkill, I thought. So I changed the interval to once a week:

defaults write com.google.Keystone.Agent checkInterval 604800 <Return>

Of course, you could delete the daemon completely but I decided against that.

Lastly, I deleted the caches in Macintosh HD/Library/Caches, that’s  <File -> Select All> then <File -> Move to Trash>. I then did the same for each user in Macintosh HD/Users/<user name>/Library/Caches. This will remove any old, broken or corrupt caches which might be causing a problem. It is safe to delete the caches as OS X will create new ones the next time the user logs in.

Finally, I restarted the Mac (still in Safe Mode) and emptied each user’s Trash. Once that was completed, I restarted the Mac normally.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Restoring files hidden in the Library folder (OS X)

When I set up my new MacBook Pro I chose not to use Migration Assistant. This meant that I had to do a fresh install of my non-Apple Applications. Not a problem, except for games such as Call of Duty 4 and Bioshock. For these it would be nice to have the data from when I’d played the games before. As for the joystick manager, the thought of having to map all those controller buttons again – Nooo!

But, you may be thinking, he has a backup of the old Mac. Right? Well yes, I have, but this is where an idiosyncrasy of the Mac OS can cause difficulties. Most games store their game saves, preferences, etc. in each user’s Library folder in a folder called Application Support . In recent versions of OS X the ~/Library folder has been deliberately hidden from casual view ‘for the user’s protection’. So although you can view the Library folder in a Finder window, when you look inside the Time Machine backup it is still not visible. So a simple click/drag of the required files isn’t an option, neither is it possible to navigate to the Library folder using the Time Machine UI.

Luckily you can use Terminal commands to get at the files and copy them. So I thought I’d write up the process for you (because I care). Command text in red.  Continue reading “Restoring files hidden in the Library folder (OS X)”

GSAK Update

So the other day I got myself a new MacBook Pro. I chose not to use Migration Assistant this time around, so I could install everything from scratch and avoid the build-up of cruft from previous upgrades getting onto my new notebook.

One job was installing GSAK. The Wine install went like a dream and I was able to import the database from the old installation easily using the Restore command.

GSAK gave me a prompt that a new version was available as an update so I thought “what the heck?” and clicked the update link. I was expecting it to freeze as I was running in Wine, not a native MS Windows platform but to my surprise it simply ran the installer and, lo! I had upgraded to 8.7. Happy with that.

New Mac

My MacBook Air (Mid 2012) was getting a bit long in the tooth. Leastways, that’s my excuse. So earlier this week I caved in and bought one of these:

MacBook Pro in a box

In the past when I’ve bought a new Mac, I’ve used Migration Assistant as part of the setup process. This time I decided to start from scratch and set it up “as new”, installing applications and configuring settings such as email “longhand”.  It has taken a bit longer but the MBP is now exactly how I want it and it isn’t bogged down with the inevitable residual cruft you get from previous upgrades (which it would have if I’d migrated from a backup of the MBA).

First impressions: Design, like it. Smaller than my MBA. Keyboard is very different, I expected that from trying it out at the Apple Store. Display – Retina – is a huge improvement over my MBA. The Touch Bar looks to be useful, although I am still mostly using the keyboard shortcuts I’ve built into my memory over the years. I’ll let you know more as I use it. One thing I am missing is the MagSafe connector for the power cable, I really think that’s a retrograde step.

Anyway…

Next step: installing GSAK. !

Have you tried turning it off and on again?

IT Crowd - Roy

Yosemite has been playing nicely on my MacBook Air so I decided it was time to upgrade the iMac.

After doing all the usual safety procedures and testing the backups it was time to upgrade. The iMac has had a few OS X upgrades since I bought it – it came with 10.6 Snow Leopard – and I did consider doing a clean install. However the “normal” upgrade route has had good reports so I opted for that.

The upgrade proceeded smoothly to begin with and I left it to get on with it, however when I returned some time later it seemed to have stuck on the last install screen at 50% complete. I left it for about half an hour and nothing had changed so I did what any highly trained Mac technician would do.

I powered it off and on again.

That did the trick and the iMac booted happily. I had been pretty sure it had got stuck at the reboot stage of the process so turning it off and on again forced the reboot it should have done by itself. Just to be on the safe side I then restarted it up in Safe (or Single User) Mode (Cmd + S) and ran /sbin/fsck -fy. Next, I booted from the Recovery Partition (Cmd + R) and used Disk Utility to repair permissions on the iMac’s startup disk.

Since then it has been fine and I’m now in the process of reorganising my data files to take advantage of iCloud Drive.

Yosemite

When Yosemite first dropped I wasn’t in the mood to be one of the “early adopters”. Normally with a new OS I’d be straight in there but I put off updating from Mavericks and I think I did the right thing. Apparently there were lots of minor problems reported on the discussion forums, not least a problem with dropped WiFi connections. Anyway, I decided I’d wait for a point release and then of course I had my eye problem…

Now that Apple have released a further point release (OS X 10.10.2) which purported amongst other things to fix the WiFi issue I thought I’d update my MacBook Air for starters. Opinion is divided between those who simply update from whatever their existing OS was and those who insist that a clean install followed by a restore of their backed-up data is the only surefire way to a reliable system. I thought I would risk the former and use my backup plan to do a clean install and restore if necessary.

I followed my usual backup method – which is really about ensuring I have a good backup in case of a SNAFU – prior to starting the update. In other words:

  1. Backup to external disk using Time Machine
  2. Create a bootable clone of the entire Macintosh HD partition on an external disk (I use Superduper!).
  3. Test the clone by booting from it and testing the basic functions of OS X.
  4. Verifying the Macintosh HD disk.

No. 4 gave me a couple of disk errors. Nothing serious. Nevertheless I booted the Mac in safe mode (that’s booting it while holding down the CMD and S keys) and running fsck to check and repair the disk:

/sbin/fsck – fy

It found some minor file allocation errors and then returned the message “Macintosh HD appears to be OK” (which is always a good sign). I rebooted it as normal and downloaded the Yosemite installer from the Apple App store.

It pays to have a Plan B, which in my case would be to restore everything to its last Mavericks configuration – I have a backup for that! – but it’s very useful to have a stand-alone copy of the OS X installer on a USB drive. If you have that, you can boot from it and run diagnostics or repairs from there and/or install the OS from scratch if need be. A useful spin-off is that if you have several Macs to update to the new OS, having a copy of the installer on a portable disk saves having to download the large installer image onto each Mac.

Starting with Mavericks, Apple have made it easy to create a bootable copy of the installer. There are other ways of doing it but I think using Apple’s “createinstallmedia” utility is fine. Here’s the method:

  1. When you download the OS X Installer app, it places it in the Applications folder. This method assumes you’ve left it there. (Don’t forget, if you run the installer and update the Mac, the installer app gets deleted from the Applications folder afterwards, so you need to create the USB copy first).
  2. Using Disk Utility, format an 8GB USB drive and give it the label “Untitled”. Leave it connected to a USB port on your Mac.
  3. Open a Terminal window and enter this command:

    sudo /Applications/Install\ OS\ X\ Yosemite.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallmedia –volume /Volumes/Untitled –applicationpath /Applications/Install\ OS\ X\ Yosemite.app –nointeraction

  4. Let it run (takes a while!) and you will be left with a bootable USB disk containing the installer.
  5. To start your Mac from the USB drive, start the Mac whilst holding the Option (alt) key down. Once the Mac starts it will display the list of available bootable drives, select the USB drive from that list.

So, having tested my backups, downloaded the OS X update and created my USB installer, I was ready to undertake the update.

The Yosemite update was very straightforward (as Apple intended) and my Mac was soon up and running. I’ve left iCloud Drive off for the moment until I’m happy that everything is working as it should.